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down the iron curtain and changing the entry into the eu of those countries that lost so many of their use to communism. and contained in this history is the crucial point about britain, about our national character, about our attitude to europe. britain is characterized not just by its independence but above all, by its openness. we have always been a country that reaches out that turns its face to the world that leads the charge in the fight for free trade and against protectionism. this is britain today, as it's always been. independent, yes, but open, too. i never want us to pull up the drawbridge and retreat from the world. i am not a british isolationist. but i do want a better deal for britain. but not just a better deal for britain. i want a better deal for europe, too. so i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants, and should want, to play a committed and active part. now, some might then ask, why raise fundamental questions about the future of europe when europe is already in the mi
's freedom we paid our parts for the iron curtain and champ named into the e.u. of those countries that lost so many figures to communists. contained in this history is a crucial point about britain, our natural character, our attitude to europe. britain is characterized, but above all by his openness. we've always been a country that reaches out that leads the charge in the fight for free trade and against protectionism. as today as it's always been. independent, yes, but open to. i never want us to put it to drawbridge and retreat from the world. i'm not a british isolationist, but i want a better deal for britain. i wanted better deal if the fantasy british prime minister for the future of the european union. a future in which wants and should want to play committed an active part. now some might then ask, why raise fundamental questions about the future of europe when europe is already in the midst to be deep crisis. why raise questions about britain's role would support in britain is already so did. there are always choices that they don't raise the difficult questions, but it is essent
for the british people to say whether they want to be in the eu or out. some were quick to criticize the move, saying it could block future risk. our correspondent reports. >> it had been a long time coming, but at last, david cameron delivered his speech on europe. he began with a repeat of what has gone wrong. the ever closer eu integration, a more flexible approach from what is required. >> if we do not address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail, and the british people will drift toward the exit. i do not want that to happen. i want the european union to be a success, and i want the relationship between britain and the european union that keeps us in it. >> the prime minister said the main problem with the growing gap between the european union and those is the there was resentment about rules and regulations. >> countries are different. they make different choices. we cannot harmonize everything. >> the solution, he said, was to try to claw back some power from the eu, and then when that was done, put it to the people. >> when we negotiate that new settlements, we will
. in the au, sovereign debt is what got the -- in the eu, sovereign debt is what got the eu into trouble. the new rules expand to go beyond sovereign debt, beyond mortgage-backed securities. i think there is a real trade- off here. many of these things will not be liquid when push comes to shove. on the other hand, if you have a very narrow set of liquid assets, if those assets get in trouble, as we learned with the euro crisis, then you have something that is a shock that would not be systemic become systemic and threaten the entire system. the only thing that is truly liquid is cash. the vast majority of us banks today -- u.s. banks today and european banks would already be compliant with these rules. i would go as far as to say that bear stearns would have in compliance with these rules, for instance. , what about taking a chance on the lottery? it has paid off for a couple of people in spain. winning ticket holders have seized more than $1 billion in the national lottery. they have been celebrating their luck. the top ticket was around $260,000. new austerity measures mean they will
the official language of carroll county. after four months of debate and public hearings they voted eu nan musely. it will require official action -- eu eu unanimously. it will require officials to speak in english. frederick and queen annes counties has the similar policy. >>> parents teach kids to respect others and to ham earth message home -- hammer the message home today it's proclaimed no name calling day here in maryland. a 10-year-old wrote a letter to the governor to make the proclamation and he did. >>> coming up tonight, family members will say final good- byes to earl weaver. the hall of fame manager died a week ago at the age of 82789 his family is holding a private ceremony in florida and a public sear money will be tomorrow. the -- ceremony will be tomorrow. the orioles will hold a memorial here in baltimore but no date has been set. >>> beginning tomorrow, get tickets to spring training for the o's. they will be in florida beginning next month. you can buy single game tickets for spring training beginning tomorrow. they kick off the spring session on february 23rd against t
of a couple in the last year to syria when the e.u.'s embargo changed, the provisions of that changed and so, i think those are advantages. >> thank you. >> mike gates. >> can you confirm in the case of an agreement between the u.k. and another government perhaps some kind of defense cooperation that doesn't have the same status as the, where we are talking about restrictions or controls on the arms exports that are purchased from british companies or exported from this country? in other words, if the mod decides to transfer equipment to another state that wouldn't be subjected to the same criteria as would apply with regards to the armed export regime? . . >> if you have further information; that would be helpful. okay. that's fine. can i ask you about the review as regards the workload that you referred to for ministers, the number of items for consideration: you said thorough overseeing of ministers went up 235 this year compared to 153 last year and 39 in the previous year before your middle east and north africa review. >> right. >> this is presumably dealt with by the human rights sect
because there are so many e.u. trips that i have been on with the bush administration and the obama administration where they blame the united states for bringing down the rest of the world when it comes to its state of the economy. it looks like now things are almost reversed in a way. tell us about your conversation with cameron. >> when i interviewed prime minister cameron here in new york and he was sort of in the lion's den because he had thrown down the gauntlet with this speech about britain's position in the european union. britain is not fully in in terms of it is not part of the eurozone. it doesn't have the euro but in many aspects it is in and it is a full member. united states depends on britain for the very strong role in international affairs. it helps all over the place whether in trying to confront iran, syria and north korea with sanctions and plays a big role whether afghanistan, iraq. david cameron is saying we like our foreign role. we like you and our economic role in the e.u. but we don't want to be a part of your political role. he is trying to negotiate a ha
eu joins us from beijing with more of the details. eunice, there have been questions about china's reliability in data. over the past couple of years. >> there's always a big question about that. in fact, goldman sachs and ubs were some of the brokerages that came out recently questioning the latest december numbers for the export figures. they were concerned that the export numbers reported by china didn't seem to match the export data from its trading partners and the slow at some of the ports. that was raising questions. the chinese officials came out and defended the numbers and said that the numbers were all well and good. there is so much skepticism about that. the trade data was looking as though it was very much in flux. however, when you take a look at those in isolation, it raises a lot of question marks. but in terms of going forward, how you read these data points, most economists say you have to look at them as guidelines. this is a developing economy. so in terms of guidelines, the latest figures that we saw for 2012 in terms of gdp or for industrial output and ever
in the election. >> i talk about this a lot, i consider myself a tpepl tph*eus, but when i watched what went on during the election and the way mitt romney was treated and the hypocrisy where the binders full of women was really ridiculed, an was treated like he was a massage tph*eus, basically and you see a picture like this with president obama, and you have the left basically making excuses for him. ruth marcus wrote something saying, it's bad but it's not an outrage. it's an outrage if it's a republican. i think this is why when they survey women and ask you do you consider a tpepl tph*eu a tpepl inch tph*eus, most women say no. martha: they don't like the implications that go along witness. let's take a look at some of the numbers here, there is a comparison of how presidents have done in terms of gender equality. i guess for lack of a better phrase. women in the cabinet, president obama so far has nine through the first term. president bush had ten total. bill clinton had 17 total. but what i was struck by, and as a woman i don't like these numbers comparison, to me it's like you don't
britain should leave the e.u. and what that would mean. that has a lot of people talking here about the implications for the u.k., for europe. whether -- we had this big discussion about new york versus london. what happens to the banking system. what happens to the financial? that is the u.k. that's become a big i issue. let's bring in a good friend, as i said, of "squawk." bob hormatz, you know him well. a new -- not a fancy new title, but you're the under secretary of state for economic growth, energy, and the environment. that changed a year ago? >> yes, we tried to pull these together. increasingly what happens in the economy has an impact on the environment. environmental issues and energy issues are increasingly intertwined. >> always big in davos. and david cameron, it has an impact on the global economy if this were to go forward. the chances of it going forward i think are small. he has to get re-elected in 2015 to propose the up or down vote in 2017. it does put a cloud over the u.k. and e.u. a bit. >> the u.s. view has been not to get involved in u.s. politics. the u.s.
account deficit at about $2.5 billion. the trade in goods deficit came to more than 9.5 billion dollar. eu and chinese consumers have been buying fewer japanese products. company directors saw exports fall by 4.2% over last year while imports rose by 0.8%. time to get a check on the markets. the yen remains weak on speculation that the prime minister will push for further monetary easing measures. the dollar hit the 89 yen level for the first time in two and a half years. that pair trading at 89.07 to 12 at the moment. the euro hit the 118 level for the first time in 20 months. that pair is changing hands at 118.10 to 15. market participants say worries about the debt situation in the euro zone has eased due to positive comments on the regional economy from the european central bank president. let's see how this is affecting the stock market. the weaker yen is prompting export on stocks. let's take a look at how other markets in the asia pacific are performing. south korea's kospi trading modestly in the negative down about .10 of a percent. look likes a bit of a mixed picture today. over
or not to stay in the european union, britain one of the e.u.'s largest economy, the most important financial center, and, oh, yes, the pound sterling at odds with the euro. markets up more than 4% year to date. my next guest says while some investors are still on the sidelines, we're beginning to see a little bit more interest. joining us now with his outlook for the markets and the economy, of course, chief investment strategist for ubs wealth management, mike ryan. mike, good to have you here. >> good to be here. lou: a lot of fun in the european union. start there. we're not hearing so much about the collapse of the e.u., david cameron has other ideas, but the reality seems to be that things are quieting down a bit over there and not influencing our markets nearly so much. >> i think that's fair. i think what we're seeing, really, in the eurozone is an absence of mall las. the last couple years, an existential crisis, would the euro and player survive? a lot has been taken off the table by the posture of the european central bank saying we're standing behind the sovereigns. where does the
partnership, intergovernmental cooperation destroys responsibility and accountability. look at the e.u. to the e.u. destroy greece or decrease destroy the e.u.? is probably does, but you can't tell them they'll blame each other. the founders didn't need the e.u. to save his dangerous. all this arises for intergovernmental cooperation and common during. the founders didn't need the e.u. because they have the example comintern for them, the articles of confederation. there is a constitution that prohibits this and makes it very, very difficult in any event. the second objection to justice breyer or rather the objection to a second party is feds want to send sworn off officers. let them try. it seems already suggested, they can't enable and if they do, they will have to pay the fiscal and critical praise. so in a weird way, it would be great if we have fbi agents in santa clara breaking down the doors of pot smokers. i will. i will tell people more but the federal government than 50 papers from the cato institute. [laughter] >> one minus point and then i will end. this is a force of the a
around the world. social democrats take control of the house and the eu is forced out of power in lower saxony. plus, optimism by the u.s. as republicans attempt to break the budget stalemate in congress. investors pulling back in japan as the boj begins its two-day meeting that's widely expected to back more easing and a new 2% inflation target. >>> and heavy snow bringing travel across northern europe. hundreds of flights canceled here in the uk. france and germany, too, with disruptions expected to continue for several days. >> yes. welcome to "worldwide exchange." ross westgate is away. he will be back later in the week from davos and along with plenty of other people and a lot of great guests. it's a three-hour program. the first three hours, i think the third you'll have to flip over to cnbc to catch. we will be heading out to washington as the capital prepares for the inauguration of president barack obama. but will he spend the next four years at the mercy of republicans? we'll explore that. plus, we'll assess if israel could be medicining for a right coalition as benjamin netan
who engage in scare will tell you that our party will come to power, rip up our agreement with the e.u. and take our country out of the eurozone break all of greece's ties with the culture civilized west and turn greece to a new north korea. my dear friends, this is the worst form of scare. my party doesn't want any of these things. we were always and will continue to be a european party. the fact we believe that europe is lost the road, in that it is imposing inhuman policies on it's very people can be considered antieuropean. of our policies have to match the best interest of the people of europe if we were to be considering ourself proeuropean. and the fact that europe is our common home and we have to protect it from the great depression that is spreading and threatening not only use europeans but the entire world economy we want to stop the splintering of europe. that's why we're against today's austerity policies. that's why we are standing against today's european us a austerity policies. i want to say it plainly, when it comes in to power. in greece wealth have one -- we'll hav
time comprehensive eu7 immigration rm passed it of during republican leadership, of it bipartisan, it wassing should that did get more democratic votes, but failed during leadership of democrats in 2007, i believe, you can't blame one sydor the other, you have to come together, that is what the american people top see. i hope that is where the president is headed. lou: always good to talk with you. >> you got it, thank you, lou. lou: coming up tomorrow, appellate attorney, peter johnson, talking about second amendment and far more. and attorney general greg abbott will be here. and jed. next, a new pro nra video game. that is right, you will never guess what the national libya media is focused on. the a-team will take them a pa part. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo, buddy! i got this. gimme one, gimme one, gimme one! the power of the
, last time comprehensive eu7 immigration rm passed it of during republican leadership, of it bipartisan, it wassing should that did get more democratic votes, but failed during leadership of democrats in 2007, i believe, you can't blame one sydor the other, you have to come together, that is what the american people top see. i hope that ishere the president is headed. lou: always good to talk with you. >> you got it, thank you, lou. lou: coming up tomorrow, appellate attorney, peter johnson, talking about second amendment and far more. and attorney general greg abbott will be here. and jed. next, a new pro nra video game. that is right, you will never guess what the national libya media is focused on. the a-team will take them a par lou: liberal plain stream media blasting nra for target shootig it comes a database of state gun laws, cnm, and nbc covering criticism surrending the nra's game release as an app. for some reason those organizations chose to ignore outrage over a new on-line video game in which players are actually they get points for murdering the president of the nra, and
" and "lemi s" topped the top fipples. 23eu78s. they strapped on ice skates and glided across the rink. the rink has been up since november and is set to close. if you want to get out there and and -- out there do it quickly. >> it is getting chilly out there. don't forget about the freeze warnings. from 2:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. expect the temperatures to drop below the freezing mark. tam cam is moving as the northerly winds are affecting us. let's get to the expected lows! 20 in the north bay. napa 25. moderate temperatures, if you can call it that near the coast and the bay with 36, 32 for oakland. interior east bay, a chilly bone cold night with antioch 29. the temperatures back east and the showers well all of this will be pushing off the coast. 63 degrees and some scattered showers. and it will be colder behind the front with st. louis 29 and denver light snow at 17. here is a look at the numbers around our state. fresno with sunshine 51. 56 for los angeles. 30 degrees tomorrow for tahoe. the accu-weather seven-day forecast, a couple more cold mornings and then get ready for nice, m
unlikely that there could be that kind of evidence in the e.u. so i think we're going to see a very similar result in europe. >> reporter: still, another issue has popped up to plague the search giant, the state department today called a planned humanitarian visit to north korea by google executive chairman eric schmidt, "not helpful." and stressed he's traveling as a private citizen, not a representative of the u.s. government. >> susie: the auto industry closed out 2012 with a bang, marking its best year since 2005. december sales of cars and trucks were better than expected, and 2013 looks to be another banner year for the industry. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: worries about the fiscal cliff weren't enough to keep buyers out of car dealerships last month. people were buying a lot of cars and trucks. >> there gets to be that certain point where buying that used car or even leasing a new a new one or even just outright buying a new one, it's really not that much more to buy a new vehicle and you can get that joy of that new car smell. >> reporter: helping auto sales last year is tha
.s. and e.u. at the same time, i think we need to be realistic. i was -- [inaudible] what was that? over ten years ago, and i think there were unnecessarily optimistic views about how quickly it could be done and uncomplicated it was. it turned out that caution was better part of judgment. i think they would have to be willing essentially to open up the markets and not use various procedures to try to safeguard their market. so i favor proceedings, but with an understanding that there are immense issues to be looked at. and it's not going happen very, very quickly. i'm in favor of starting it. [inaudible] it's fancy language for -- regulations. whether allow european -- to you see opportunities to streamline the way the two economies governor themselves? >> it's the latter. let me put it this way. we have dealt with the issues regarding safeguards, safeguards and others with ore countries. we did that in negotiation with colombia. we did that in negotiations with panama. if any two entities resolve those issues, it's the e.u. and united states. essentially what the e.u. has been doing, in my
in europe and the u.s. the european process is a finding at the e.u. level. we have been for investigation for it almost two years by the commissioner there and his staff. during this period, they comment from everybody and we give them literally millions of documents. we are busy negotiating with them. we don't think we violated any european laws, but we're happy to have the conversation and we're sort of now waiting on with a they decide to do. we have been negotiating back and forth and they have announced that publicly. in the united states, the law is similar but different if the way it's applied. in our indication, the government to have the federal trade commission look at this and a similar investigation is underway. there were a series of hearings. i testified at the hearings and, again, i don't see the consumer arm under section 2 and we have asked the government to come back and give us the examples of things which are violations of law. we haven't seen that yet. we are also in negotiations with them. that's probably all i should say. what i would say is we talk to these people
consult assistants. >> is it the '60s? '0*eu7 z? >> yes. i used their report because of the reports they did. they were very good reports and some of the historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally, they -- by the time that roe v. wade was decided if i would write something as a history abortion rights for them. and how that plays out and what the history back to england and so on. and i did a report for them. >> what is your history? where are you from. >> nashville, tennessee. i group in nashville and my family and relatives are all still there. i went to pearl high school, and i went to howard university. i graduated and went to the university of michigan. >> law school? >> first the history department write got a ph.d. then i went law school. i wanted to do legal history. those days you had to get both degrees. you couldn't get them at the same time. now you can. i had to do one then the other. then . >> did you come north to graduate school on purpose? >> i came to howard, yes, i came on purpose. absolutely. >> why? >> i went to segregated schools
minister david cameron made a critical speech on the uk's rocky relationship with the eu. cameron proposed a bold referendum to allow british voters to decide whether or not to exit the alliance by 2016. >> there's no doubt we're more powerful than washington, delhi because we're a powerful player inside the union that matters for british jobs, and security. it matters to our ability to get things done in the world. it matters to the united states and other friends around the world, which is why many tell us clearly they want britain to remain in the european union. if we left the european union, it would be a one-way ticket, not a return. >>> let's take an early look at the markets. we'll get all up in your business this morning. steve sedgwick is live in london, which is still at this hour firmly part of the european union. >> and set to be for a bit longer. there was a huge caveat to what david cameron said there in that sound bite. he wants more competition in europe, more accountability, better growth and wants us to get out of the eurozone debt crisis. he wants to renegotiate with eu
that there could be that kind of evidence in the e.u. so i think we're going to see a very similar result in europe. >> reporter: still, another issue has popped up to plague the search giant, the state department today called a planned humanitarian visit to north korea by google executive chairman eric schmidt, "not helpful." and stressed he's traveling as a private citizen, not a representative of the u.s. government. >> susie: the auto industry closed out 2012 with a bang, marking its best year since 2005. december sales of cars and trucks were better than expected, and 2013 looks to be another banner year for the industry. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: worries about the fiscal cliff weren't enough to keep buyers out of car dealerships last month. people were buying a lot of cars and trucks. >> there gets to be that certain point where buying that used car or even leasing a new a new one or even just outright buying a new one, it's really not that much more to buy a new vehicle and you can get that joy of that new car smell. >> reporter: helping auto sales last year is that the average age
on the first count and now it turns out that they are not right about that one either. according to eu magazine, the cars were not recycle. they shredded them. that process sent tons of parts to landfills each year. so which cars ended up in the shredder? that list is tonight's top five. number five is the chevy blazer. 50 miles per gallon, about a clunker. this gm classic is clearly a clunker. it was redesigned in the '90s is a smaller percentage before being discontinued. before that, the dodge caravan. it was one of the biggest hits for chrysler. the company plans to make them through 2014. the jeep grand cherokee is another one. this vehicle is still popular with off-road enthusiast even though it only gets about 50 miles per gallon. number two is the board f150. but it only gets about 17 miles per gallon. in the number one most traded in clunker is the ford explorer. very popular in the late '90s and early two 2000. it gets about 20 miles per gallon. and the number one was the toyota corolla. it gets much better gas mileage and many of those. that was the car that these clunkers were treat
to respond. they have not taken any decisions beyond that. it is now for a eu states coming up at the 12th of march deadline whether or not they want to amend that in any way. it could be an unmanned -- amended so it would apply to the regime and not to opposition forces. it could be amended in many other ways. it would require the agreement of all member states. >> i understand we are already supplying equipment to elements within the surreal -- syria opposition. i am interested to know, that could be military. how strict is this embargo? is it possible if we are giving communications equipment that could be used a in conjunction with weaponry supplied by turkey? or some other countries to elements within the opposition? >> it is not military. it is certainly not lethal. the assistance includes things like the deployment of our response team to work with their opposition on their future plans. how they are getting help to people with basic needs. we are training through citizen journalist. we are providing water purification hits and generators to help civilians. -- water purification kit
the e.u. to impose sanctions on hezbollah, and you have been a believer that we should not do it alone, we should do with unilateral. what we do take the chance and urged the european union to sanction has a lot? is we shouldn insurer swer not be writing lesser proof, i think the president is the appropriate official. >> and congress has no interest in whether the e.u. would be sanctioned as a terrorist or a station? >> the congress has a responsibility in a lot of things. >> that me ask you this about the iranian revolutionary guard. he said a minute ago you think they are a terrorist recession. do you agree? bailout yes. >> and you voted against the amendment designating them as a terrorist organization because they are recognized as a state? iran, you would not want to designate the army of a recognized as a terrorist? >> i just clarify a statement on iran being a recognized nation by the nine nations, by most world bodies. the reason why i did not vote as 22 other members that because i think jim webb's argument was a strong argument, and that is we have -- and this is what he said
in the motor race, though. we've had a big eu change on the agenda. >> yeah. >> we don't know how that's going to come out in the wash, do we? >> that changes things around. but in the short-term, it does mean that the markets are a little more volatile and it has been a sizable change. >> it's just unfortunate to some degree that these natural disasters which affect many people and are stressful events to live through then cause insurance premium toes rise, which sounds like that's what's happening in part of the u.s. >> it varies, but long-term insurers will look to make profit over a period of time. when they do happen, they have to look at have they been in line with all their expectations? >> and what's happening with capacity? it's dictated by capacity levels. >> yeah. pnc, capital comes in and out frequently been we are seeing money coming into the insurance sector. as capacity comes in, rates will go down. >> i want to talk about life, but first to cap off what happened with superstorm sandy, it took a while to get a sense of how costly that event was. what's emerging? >> i think most
brown with your fox news minute. talk of britain leaving the european union. eu membership will be up to a referendum. voters should decide whether the uk should stay in the 27 member euro zone. the first priority is renegotiating the eu treaty. timothy geithner at last they will be friday. president obama has elected jack lew. much of the u.s. experiencing the coldest temperatures in two years. for death are blamed on the cold snap. the bitter conditions are expected to stay into the weekend. dagen, back to you. dagen: jamie dimon apologizing. also, stepping up and saying back off. there is more regulation needed. he said all of this at the world economic forum. we are president and chief investment officer. he is in rochester, new york. maybe the only place on the planet that is colder than where you are sitting right now. >> happy to be here. dagen: what do you say to jamie dimon? there was one hedge fund manager that went after him. he said back off. >> well, jamie is right about the capitalization. he has incredibly strong capital. a lot of the standards forced the banks to have
. defended dialogue with hamas. refused to join in a letter calling on e.u. to condemn hezbollah. he had a pejorative comment to jewish lobby. he has taken stances that indicateed he is less than supportive of the relationship with israel. >> there are two key democrats that could factor in how this goes. one is new york democratic senator schumer. >> he is staying quiet on the fight. talk about the real oppositio opposition. i think there will be some tough hurdles to get over with republicans. but i don't think there is enough democratic fight to stop the nomination. out of loyalty to the president who don't want him appointed will vote for him. >> bret: john kerry, fair to say he has an easy ride? >> yeah. it's an opportunity to get questions answered on benghazi or put it front and center in how the future of the state department will be run. no, i don't think there is any problem with him. >> bret: you agree, carl? >> it's interesting hearing. i agree that the committee means he gets approved but he will be asked about benghazi and about the basic tenets. and he will go on about the
to israel, but what they pose to america. when they call on the eu to designate hezbollah terrorist organization. they cite the damage that hezbollah has done to american military men and women and american security interests and for steve to just, you know, like sweep this away is, this is just israel and israel supporters wanting a bunch of love letters is really, i'd say, actually, offensive. if you look -- why is ben carden. senior democrat in a democratic conference. he came out today. so, this is a senior democrat knowing that the president of his party is about to nominate chuck hagel for secretary of defense and ben carden is raising serious questions. yet, another democrat to raise questions. what is giving them pause? i don't think it's as simple as steve just dismissed it. these love letters or disagreement over some love letters to israel. real national security issues at stake. senator hagel was opposed to sanctions against syria. one of a handful of sanctions -- >> i want to get steve to respond to you on that. i want to throw in this issue. what is a bigger issue for
and then the eu, arms embargo in 2004, a flood of weaponry came into libya. most of it was over a billion dollars, which in absolute terms may not be that great but relative to what was there before and what the purpose is, what it was used for, created, i was an unfair playing field. you couldn't say that we were, your, this was not a usual issue a source we were concerned. that process, and i argue, as i argue in the book, was very much tied to the whole issue of ask not, putting accountability in place for, you know, what we would get, what gadhafi would not do as a result of the agreements that were signed with him. a lot of people, i think that weaponry, again, small arms, surveillance equipment, all of the sort of things you'd need to put down a popular revolt was put in the hands of the regime, essentially due to complicity and lack of attention by parties in the west. so that's one, one thing. as far as what president, civil war, you know, civil wars are, you know, that's a key question, and i don't -- the preponderance come in, the rebels themselves managed to present a case that ask for
, the eu are still our enemy. you should sign the paper you never leave sudan, never travel out of sudan, and never [indiscernible] and i did not. >> he refused? >> i refused to sign it. >> we still on the hunger strike? >> yes. >> they put in a feeding tube for you? >> [indiscernible] after i arrived in the sudan hospital. >> the ticket onto an airplane at guantanamo? they put you on a plane on guantanamo? >> yes. me and to the people from sudan -- two people from sudan. >> did they put back on your head? >> people from afghanistan. they took us from guantanamo and landing in baghdad, iraq. then they changed the aircraft and set me to sudan. we had another guy from morocco to sudan. >> when you landed in khartoum, was your family there? >> my family at that time was in doha, but they came to me. when i came to sudan, because i sat too long, but did not understand where i was. i did not feel anything. i opened my eyes and i find myself in the hospital in sudan. after five or six years, my wife and my son. >> did you recognize your son? >> of course. of course. by feeling, not by his face
a strong u.k. and a strong e.u. so i'm wondering what the white house makes of the announcement today that there will be a referendum on that issue and what the united states has at stake in the u.k. staying part of the e.u. >> we welcome the prime minister's call for britain to remain in the e.u. and to retain a leading role in europe's institutions and as the president told the prime minister when they spoke last week, the united states values a strong united kingdom and a strong european union. we value our central relationship with the u.k. as well as our relationship with the european union which makes critical contributions to peace, prosperity and security in europe and around the world. we believe that the united kingdom is stronger as a result of its european union's membership and we believe the european union is stronger as a result of having the united kingdom in the e.u. so that's -- our views on this are very clear. the internal process by which these matters are considered within the u.k. or any other country are obviously the province of those countries and those gover
is qualifying for e.u. bail-out money. 2013 is bringing more protests. young and old in athens. unemployment in greece is higher than spain. and pensions are slinking. >> we are rapidly going backwards. far backwards. the only battle is the battle on the street. >> greece is trying to keep a lid on things. mass transit strike in the second week. officials say they will jail workers if they don't go back on the job. greeks are tired. this is a hassle but what can we do? >> this is watched by the u.s. wall street buffeted by the european trouble. washington planning austerity moves and taxes and all are hoping what has happened in europe isn't a preview of years to come. bret? >> bret: greg palkot in london. thanks. >>> you have heard the talk is cheap. the promises are not. concerns entitlements and how to pay for them. jim angle says the president didn't shed light on that earlier in week. >> treated like innellis. he had several issues in inaugural address but one in particular stuck out to some. comment about entitlement. s. >> the commitment we make to each other, through medicare and soc
the sum total of all of your votes, refusing to sign a letter to the e.u. asking hezbollah to be designated a terrorist organization, being one of 22 to vote to guard terrorist terrorist organization, one of two to vote on sanction this body tried to make on iran and the statements you made after palestinians and about the jewish lobby, all of that together, that the image you created is one of sending the worst possible signal to enemies and friends at one of the most critical times in world history? >> i would not agree with that. if you had a chance tomorrow, today, after lunch, vote to say the iranian revolutionary guard was terrorist organization would you vote no? >> times change. it recognize that. yes, i would reconsider. >> thank you. that encouraging. >> bret: interesting exchange with lindsey graham. back with the panel. you talk about senator graham's exchange with chuck hagel. >> now that we have shown everyone how spontaneous and non-rehearsed we, are i was thinking of the tape where he quotes hagel saying the jewish lobby has intimidated senators in to voting
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